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12

Mar

2014

How To Heal Plantar Fasciitis


There are a number of plantar fasciitis causes. The plantar fascia ligament is like a rubber band and loosens and contracts with movement. It also absorbs significant weight and pressure. Because of this function, plantar fasciitis can easily occur from a number of reasons. Among the most common is an overload of physical activity or exercise. Athletes are particularly prone to plantar fasciitis and commonly suffer from it. Excessive running, jumping, or other activities can easily place repetitive or excessive stress on the tissue and lead to tears and inflammation, resulting in moderate to severe pain.

Pronounced as "plantar fash-ee-eye-tis," plantar means "foot," while fasciitis means "inflammation." Plantar Fasciitis is a serious, painful and progressing illness that occurs when the long, flat ligament along the bottom of the foot develops either tears or inflammation. Serious cases of plantar fasciitis can possibly lead to ruptures of the ligament itself. This ligament is called the plantar fascia and it extends the toes and runs along the bottom of the foot, attaching to your heel. Such repetitive force can pull the fascia from its attachment on your heel and cause damage and plantar fasciitis.

Is there a difference between Plantar Fasciitis and heel spurs? While there is a difference between the two conditions, they are related. Plantar fasciitis is a condition where the thick tissue on the bottom or your foot becomes irritated and swollen. Plantar Fasciitis means inflammation of your plantar fascia. The plantar fascia is tissue that holds up the bones on the bottom of your foot. When you have this condition you usually feel pain in the bottom or your heel. This may be due to arch problems. When your plantar fascia pulls away from the heel, calcium deposits can form there.

Let us begin the discussion with a short explanation on what is plantar fasciitis. The human foot consists of plantar fascia, which is a thick and fibrous band of tissues, that originate from the lowermost surface of the heel bone and stretches along the sole of the foot, towards the toes. Plantar fasciitis is an inflammatory and painful condition of the plantar fascia. It is characterized by heel pain of light or severe nature. Plantar fasciitis is a commonly found condition in the United States and it has been observed that, every year almost two million Americans encounter plantar fasciitis.

A good exercise that you can perform before sitting up is to stretch your foot by moving it up and down ten times. An alternative exercise you should do while sitting is to roll a rolling pin or tennis ball with the arch of your foot. Once you can, move on to doing this exercise as you are standing up. After these exercises, put on your shoes with arch support inserts inside them, or wear supportive sandals. Don’t start the day walking without shoes on hard floors or tiles, or it can be guaranteed that your heel pain will come back.plantar fasciitis

Originally is was assumed that Plantar Fasciitis was just an inflammatory condition, however inflammation is only rarely the cause. Individuals with flat feet/no arches or very high arches are more prone to plantar fasciitis than individuals with normal arches. Other causes or risk factors for plantar fasciitis are sudden weight gain or obesity, long distance running, and poor arch support in shoes. I have extremely flat and pronated feet, had gained weight rapidly during each of my pregnancies and also didn’t get orthotic inserts regularly, choosing rather to try and extend the life of old supports.

When the plantar fascia, or the thick tissue in the bottom of the foot that connects the heel to the toes, becomes overstretched, it becomes inflamed. This condition is known as plantar fasciitis. This inflammation makes it difficult to walk and perform certain movements of the foot. It may be caused by shoes with poor support; sudden weight gain; long distance running, especially downhill or on uneven surfaces; or a tight Achilles tendon. People whose feet have a high arch or are flat footed are also prone to plantar fasciitis. You Might Also Like Symptoms.

The plantar fascia is actually a thick, fibrous band of connective tissue which originates at the heel bone and runs along the bottom of the foot in a fan-like manner, attaching to the base of each of the toes. A rather tough, resilient structure, the plantar fascia takes on a number of critical functions during running and walking. It stabilizes the metatarsal joints (the joints associated with the long bones of the foot) during impact with the ground, acts as a shock absorber for the entire leg, and helps to lift the longi-tudinal arch of the foot to prepare it for the 'take-off' phase of the gait cycle.

Regular gentle stretching is the key. Patients should be sure to start their stretching very slowly and carefully at the start of your treatment because going too far at first during the first points of treatment and recovery can easily re-injure the plantar fascia and aggravate the condition. Slow and steady is the best approach to stretching and best results are brought about by a 'little and frequent' approach. Patients should stretch at least two times daily (preferably more) instead of diving into one long, over enthusiastic stretching session on once in a while basis.

While a well designed athletic shoe can prevent foot damage that leads to plantar fasciitis, treatment of the problem requires special help. Once the problem has been diagnosed by a podiatrist, special inserts or orthopedic shoes will probably be prescribed until healing is completed. Regardless of this form of treatment, it is still always a good idea to look for the best shoes for plantar fasciitis in order to get the maximum benefit of your therapeutic regimen, as getting the right pair of shoes is essential if you to foster a healing environment around your foot.plantar fasciitis

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Comments: 1
  • #1

    Plantar Fasciitis (Monday, 04 August 2014 02:39)

    I think this is thoroughly unparalleled.